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Christie, J. et al. (2006) Standards, Science, and the Role of Play in Early Literacy Education (Book Section)

Abstract:

In Play=Learning, top experts in child development and learning contend that in over-emphasizing academic achievement, our culture has forgotten about the importance of play for children's development.

Date:
January 2006
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
57-73
Synonyms:
  • Academic outcomes
  • Literacy
  • Pre-academic skills
  • Pretend play
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Dickinson, D. et al. (2019) Effects of Teacher-Delivered Book Reading and Play on Vocabulary Learning and Self-Regulation among Low-Income Preschool Children (Journal Article)

Fisher, K. et al. (2008) Conceptual split? Parents' and experts' perceptions of play in the 21st century (Journal Article)

Abstract:
Date:
July 2008
Volume:
29
Page/s:
305-316
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Fisher, K. et al. (2010) Playing around in School: Implications for Learning and Educational Policy (Book Section)

Abstract:

A fundamental question has spawned fervent debates in classrooms and on Capitol Hill: How do we best educate children to be successful in a global, ever-changing world? Here we present the evidence that playful learning pedagogies not only promote important academic learning but also build the skills required for success in the 21st century. A brief review of current educational trends and their underlying philosophies is followed by the introduction to of the concept of “playful learning,” a teaching approach that uses free-play and guided-play activities to promote academic, socio-emotional, and cognitive development. The chapter then reviews correlational, observational, and experimental literature on playing around in school and offers suggestions and future directions for research in the emerging playful learning domain.

Date:
January 2010
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Academic outcomes
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Free play
  • Guided-play
  • Literature review
  • Playful learning
Relevant age group/s:
Tags:

Fisher, K. et al. (2013) Taking Shape: Supporting Preschoolers' Acquisition of Geometric Knowledge Through Guided Play (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Shape knowledge, a key aspect of school readiness, is part of early mathematical learning. Variations in how children are exposed to shapes may affect the pace of their learning and the nature of their shape knowledge. Building on evidence suggesting that child-centered, playful learning programs facilitate learning more than other methods, 4- to 5-year-old children (N = 70) were taught the properties of four geometric shapes using guided play, free play, or didactic instruction. Results revealed that children taught shapes in the guided play condition showed improved shape knowledge compared to the other groups, an effect that was still evident after 1 week. Findings suggest that scaffolding techniques that heighten engagement, direct exploration, and facilitate “sense-making,” such as guided play, undergird shape learning.

Date:
January 2013
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
n/a–n/a
Synonyms:
  • Academic outcomes
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Experimental
  • Free play
  • Learning
  • Playful learning
  • Pre-academic skills
  • Guided-play
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Singer, D. et al. (2006) Play = Learning: how play motivates and enhances children's cognitive and social-emotional growth (Book)

Abstract:

Why is it that the best and brightest of our children are arriving at college too burned out to profit from the smorgasbord of intellectual delights that they are offered? Why is it that some preschools and kindergartens have a majority of children struggling to master cognitive tasks that are inappropriate for their age? Why is playtime often considered to be time unproductively spent? In Play=Learning, top experts in child development and learning contend that the answers to these questions stem from a single source: in the rush to create a generation of Einsteins, our culture has forgotten about the importance of play for children`s development. Presenting a powerful argument about the pervasive and long-term effects of play, Singer, Golinkoff, and Hirsh-Pasek urge researchers and practitioners to reconsider the ways play facilitates development across domains. Over forty years of developmental research indicates that play has enormous benefits to offer children, not the least of which is physical activity in this era of obesity and hypertension. Play provides children with the opportunity to maximize their attention spans, learn to get along with peers, cultivate their creativity, work through their emotions, and gain the academic skills that are the foundation for later learning. Using a variety of methods and studying a wide range of populations, the contributors to this volume demonstrate the powerful effects of play in the intellectual, social, and emotional spheres. Play=Learning will be an important resource for students and researchers in developmental psychology. Its research-based policy recommendations will be valuable to teachers, counselors, and school psychologists in their quest to reintroduce play and joyful learning into our school rooms and living rooms.

Date:
January 2006
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • Atypical development
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Free play
  • Learning
  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Physical play
  • Playful learning
  • Pre-academic skills
  • Pretend play
  • Science
Research discipline:

Toub, T. et al. (2018) The language of play: Developing preschool vocabulary through play following shared book-reading (Journal Article)

Weisberg, D. et al. (2013) Embracing complexity: Rethinking the relation between play and learning: Comment on Lillard et al. (2013) (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Lillard et al. (2013) concluded that pretend play is not causally related to child outcomes and charged that the field is subject to a play ethos, whereby research is tainted by a bias to find positive effects of play on child development. In this commentary, we embrace their call for a more solidly scientific approach to questions in this important area of study while offering 2 critiques of their analysis. First, we urge researchers to take a more holistic approach to the body of evidence on play and learning, rather than relying on piecemeal criticisms of individual studies, since positive effects of play on learning emerge despite the use of a variety of methods, contents, and experimental conditions. Second, we consider how best to study this topic in the future and propose moving away from traditional empirical approaches to more complicated statistical models and methods that will allow us to embrace the full variety and complexity of playful learning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

Date:
January 2013
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
139
Page/s:
35-39
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Learning
  • Playful learning
  • Pretend play
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Weisberg, D. et al. (2013) Guided Play: Where Curricular Goals Meet a Playful Pedagogy (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Decades of research demonstrate that a strong curricular approach to preschool education is important for later developmental outcomes. Although these findings have often been used to support the implementation of educational programs based on direct instruction, we argue that guided play approaches can be equally effective at delivering content and are more developmentally appropriate in their focus on child-centered exploration. Guided play lies midway between direct instruction and free play, presenting a learning goal, and scaffolding the environment while allowing children to maintain a large degree of control over their learning. The evidence suggests that such approaches often outperform direct-instruction approaches in encouraging a variety of positive academic outcomes. We argue that guided play approaches are effective because they create learning situations that encourage children to become active and engaged partners in the learning process.

Date:
January 2013
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
7
Page/s:
104–112
Synonyms:
  • Academic outcomes
  • Free play
  • Literature review
  • Playful learning
  • Pre-academic skills
  • Guided-play
Relevant age group/s: