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Baumer, S. et al. (2005) Promoting narrative competence through adult–child joint pretense: Lessons from the Scandinavian educational practice of playworld (Journal Article)

Abstract:

This paper examines the effects of the playworld educational practice on the development of narrative competence in 5- to 7-year-old children. The playworld educational practice is derived from play pedagogy and the theory of narrative learning, both developed and implemented in Scandinavia. The playworld practice consists of joint adult–child pretense based in a work of children's literature, discussion, free play, and visual art production. When compared to children under a control intervention (conventional school practices without pretend play), children who participated in the playworld practice show significant improvements in narrative length, coherence, and comprehension, although not in linguistic complexity. These findings provide further evidence concerning the role of pretense in the narrative development of young children.

Date:
January 2005
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
20
Page/s:
576-590
Synonyms:
  • Academic outcomes
  • Literacy
  • Pedagogy
  • Playful learning
  • Pretend play
  • Semiotic play
  • Teacher/caregiver play
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Carlson, S. et al. (2014) Evidence for a relation between executive function and pretense representation in preschool children (Journal Article)

Abstract:
Date:
January 2014
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
29
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Kang, E. et al. (2016) Predictors and Moderators of Spontaneous Pretend Play in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder (Journal Article)

McCune, L. et al. (2015) Dynamic systems in semiotic development: The transition to reference (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Semiotic development involves the development of at least two different kinds of meaning: intersubjective and representational. By attending to these two kinds of meaning we are able to predict one of the major transitions in early childhood: the transition to reference. From a dynamic systems perspective we track essential developments which, when all have reached critical values, prompt the transition to referential word production and/or comprehension in the first half of the second year of life. We present the background of the four variables included in the model: (a) representational play, (b) vocalization ability, (c) gesture, and (d) developments in autonomic vocalization culminating in communicative grunts. We further demonstrate their efficacy in predicting the transition in a longitudinal sample of 10 children. Additional study is needed to confirm the role of these developments and to extend the approach to languages other than English and more advanced levels of semiotic development.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2015
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
36
Page/s:
161-170
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Exploratory play
  • Language
  • Longitudinal
  • Semiotic play
  • Symbolic play
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Sills, J. et al. (2016) The role of collaboration in the cognitive development of young children: a systematic review (Journal Article)

Abstract:
Date:
January 2016
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
42
Page/s:
313-324
Synonyms:
  • Cooperative play
  • Language
  • Problem-solving
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Sim, Z. et al. (2017) Learning higher-order generalizations through free play: Evidence from 2- and 3-year-old children (Journal Article)

Abstract:
Author/s:
Date:
January 2017
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
53
Page/s:
642-651
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Zosh, J. et al. (2018) Accessing the Inaccessible: Redefining Play as a Spectrum (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Defining play has plagued researchers and philosophers for years. From describing play as an inaccessible concept due to its complexity, to providing checklists of features, the field has struggled with how to conceptualize and operationalize “play.” This theoretical piece reviews the literature about both play and learning and suggests that by viewing play as a spectrum – that ranges from free play (no guidance or support) to guided play and games (including purposeful adult support while maintaining playful elements), we better capture the true essence of play and explain its relationship to learning. Insights from the Science of Learning allow us to better understand why play supports learning across social and academic domains. By changing the lens through which we conceptualize play, we account for previous findings in a cohesive way while also proposing new avenues of exploration for the field to study the role of learning through play across age and context.

Date:
January 2018
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
9
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Free play
  • Learning
  • Playful learning
  • Guided-play
  • Literature review
  • Play with other adult
Relevant age group/s:
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