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Definition

George, J. et al. (2017) Measurement of father-child rough-and-tumble play and its relations to child behaviour: Measurement of rough-and-tumble play (Journal Article)

Ginsburg, K. et al. (2007) The Importance of Play in Promoting Healthy Child Development and Maintaining Strong Parent-Child Bonds (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Please click on the link provided below to read the abstract.

Date:
January 2007
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
119
Page/s:
182-191
Synonyms:
  • Exploratory play
  • Free play
  • Literature review
  • Mental health
  • Physical health
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Gray, P. (2011) The decline of play and the rise of psychopathology in children and adolescents (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Over the past half century, in the United States and other developed nations, children’s free play with other children has declined sharply. Over the same period, anxiety, depression, suicide, feelings of helplessness, and narcissism have increased sharply in children, adolescents, and young adults. This article documents these historical changes and contends that the decline in play has contributed to the rise in the psychopathology of young people. Play functions as the major means by which children (1) develop intrinsic interests and competencies; (2) learn how to make decisions, solve problems, exert self-control, and follow rules; (3) learn to regulate their emotions; (4) make friends and learn to get along with others as equals; and (5) experience joy. Through all of these effects, play promotes mental health. Key words: anxiety; decline of play; depression; feelings of helplessness; free play; narcissism; psychopathology in children; suicide

Author/s:
Date:
January 2011
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
3
Page/s:
443–463
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Free play
  • Literature review
  • Mental health
  • Social-emotional
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Hart, S. (2016) Inclusion, Play and Empathy (Book)

Abstract:

Contributions from early childhood educators, teachers, psychologists, music therapists, occupational therapists, and psychotherapists highlight the crucial role that early relationships and interactions in group settings play in the development of children's personal, emotional and social skills. The book features the latest research and methods for successfully encouraging the development of these skills in groups of children aged 4-12. It explores how play within children's groups can be facilitated in order to foster emotional and empathic capacities, how to overcome common challenges to inclusion in schools and introduces practical, creative approaches to cultivating a sense of unity and team spirit in children's groups.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2016
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Affective behaviour
  • Creativity
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Games with rules
  • Learning
  • Mental health
  • Musical play
  • Peers play
  • Physical play
  • Self-regulation
  • Social play
  • Social-emotional
  • Well-being outcomes
Research discipline:

Howard, J. et al. (2013) The impact of children's perception of an activity as play rather than not play on emotional well-being (Journal Article)

Abstract:

BackgroundAs an important aspect of health and development, a number of policy and practice initiatives across education, health and social care are aimed at increasing children's emotional well-being. Links have been made between young children's emotional well-being and play although empirical evidence is limited. This paper demonstrates that when children perceive an activity as play, they show more signs of emotional well-being than when they perceive the same activity as not play.MethodsOne hundred and twenty-nine children aged between 3 and 5 years participated in the study. The cues children use to differentiate play and not play were used to create an activity session that was ‘like play’ and an activity session that was ‘not like play’. The activity itself remained constant. Children were allocated to either of the activity session types alternately and emotional well-being was measured using the Leuvens Involvement Scale.ResultsThere was a significant difference in the level of emotional well-being displayed by children in the two activity session types. Children who undertook the ‘like play’ activity scored significantly higher than children who undertook the same activity but ‘not like play’. Detailed observational analysis also showed increased behavioural indicators relating to emotional well-being among children participating in the ‘like play’ rather than ‘not like play’ activity session.ConclusionChildren demonstrate increased emotional well-being when they perceive an activity as play rather than not play. Findings support the proposition that play can be seen as an observable behaviour but also as a mental state. As well as providing important evidence as to the value of play for enhancing children's emotional well-being, findings are discussed in relation to professional practice in children's services. The paper highlights the training needs of practitioners to enable them to understand children's views about play and use this information to create playful situations which maximize the developmental potential of play.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2013
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
39
Page/s:
737-742
Synonyms:
  • Mental health
  • Playfulness
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Hubbs-Tait, L. et al. (1996) Children of adolescent mothers: attachment representation, maternal depression, and later behavior problems (Journal Article)

Jarareh, J. et al. (2016) The impact of group play therapy on creativity and control of aggression in preschool children (Journal Article)

Abstract:

AbstractThe main purpose of conducting this study was to investigate the effectiveness of group play therapy in preschool children’s creativity and aggression control. The research method was experimental along with pretest-posttest design in control group.The sample of study included all preschool students of Dehloran town with a total number of 60 students from preschool students that (30 subjects in experimental group and 30 subjects in control group) were selected by multistage random cluster sampling. The research instruments were Torrance’s creativity questionnaire and aggressiveness questionnaire of Shahim. Their reliability and validity have been confirmed and to analyze the findings, covariance analysis test was used. The major findings of the research indicate that, group play therapy in preschool children’s creativity and aggressionhas a significant effect on the level of 0.01 and it enhances creativity and reduces aggression in preschool children.

Date:
January 2016
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
3
Page/s:
1264655
Synonyms:
  • Affective behaviour
  • Creativity
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Experimental
  • Games with rules
  • Mental health
  • Social-emotional
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:

Jarvis, P. et al. (2014) On ‘becoming social’: the importance of collaborative free play in childhood (Journal Article)

Abstract:

There is increasing concern about declining mental health amongst children in the UK and the USA. Evolutionary and anthropological theorists have begun to build a theory linking this situation to decreasing opportunities to engage in free play. This paper will explore typical contexts for children in these nations, concluding that a range of recently emerging environments have decreased opportunities for collaborative peer free play and ‘discovery’ activities for the current generation. We will draw the theoretical analysis from a broad area of research encompassing psychology, anthropology, education, sociology, marketing, and philosophy to offer a new blend of practical and theoretical perspectives that may shed further light upon this topic.

Date:
January 2014
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
3
Page/s:
53-68
Synonyms:
  • Free play
  • Literature review
  • Mental health
  • Outdoor play
  • Peers play
  • Social play
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Johnson, J. et al. (2015) The Handbook of the Study of Play (Book)

Abstract:

The Handbook of the Study of Play brings together in two volumes thinkers whose diverse interests at the leading edge of scholarship and practice define the current field. Because play is an activity that humans have shared across time, place, and culture and in their personal developmental timelines—and because this behavior stretches deep into the evolutionary past—no single discipline can lay claim to exclusive rights to study the subject. Thus this handbook features the thinking of evolutionary psychologists; ethologists and biologists; neuroscientists; developmental psychologists; psychotherapists and play therapists; historians; sociologists and anthropologists; cultural psychologists; philosophers; theorists of music, performance, and dance; specialists in learning and language acquisition; and playground designers. Together, but out of their varied understandings, the incisive contributions to The Handbook take on vital questions of educational policy, of literacy, of fitness, of the role of play in brain development, of spontaneity and pleasure, of well-being and happiness, of fairness, and of the fuller realization of the self. These volumes also comprise an intellectual history, retrospective looks at the great thinkers who have made possible the modern study of play.

Date:
January 2015
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
II
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Games with rules
  • Learning
  • Mental health
  • Musical play
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Physical play
  • Playground
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:

Lyons-Ruth, K. (2008) Play, Precariousness, and the Negotiation of Shared Meaning: A Developmental Research Perspective on Child Psychotherapy: Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy: Vol 5, No 2 (Journal Article)