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Definition

Moore, M. et al. (2006) Pretend play as a resource for children: implications for pediatricians and health professionals (Journal Article)

Abstract:
Author/s:
Date:
June 2006
Volume:
27
Page/s:
237-248
Synonyms:
  • Literature review
  • Mental health
  • Pretend play
  • Symbolic play
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Newman, S. et al. (2016) On ‘becoming social’: the importance of collaborative free play in childhood: International Journal of Play: Vol 3, No 1 (Web Page)

Nijhof, S. et al. (2018) Healthy play, better coping: The importance of play for the development of children in health and disease (Journal Article)

O’Farrelly, C. et al. (2019) Reconstructing readiness: Young children’s priorities for their early school adjustment (Journal Article)

Panksepp, J. (2007) Can PLAY diminish ADHD and facilitate the construction of the social brain? (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Abstract
The diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) has been increasing at an alarming rate, paralleled by the prescription of highly effective psychostimulants whose developmental effects on growing brains remain inadequately characterized. One reason for the increasing incidence of ADHD may be the diminishing availability of opportunities for pre-school children to engage in natural self-generated social play. Pre-clinical work indicates that play can facilitate behavioral inhibition in growing animals, while psychostimulants reduce playfulness. The idea that intensive social play interventions, throughout early childhood, may alleviate ADHD symptoms remains to be evaluated. As an alternative to the use of play-reducing psychostimulants, society could establish play “sanctuaries” for at-risk children in order to facilitate frontal lobe maturation and the healthy development of pro-social minds.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2007
Volume:
16
Page/s:
57
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Free play
  • Literature review
  • Mental health
  • Outdoor play
  • Physical play
  • Pro-social behaviour
  • Self-regulation
  • Social play
  • Social-emotional
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Panksepp, J. et al. (2014) Preclinical Modeling of Primal Emotional Affects (SEEKING, PANIC and PLAY): Gateways to the Development of New Treatments for Depression (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Mammalian brains contain at least 7 primal emotional sys- tems – SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, PANIC and PLAY (capitalization reflects a proposed primary-process terminol- ogy, to minimize semantic confusions and mereological falla- cies). These systems help organisms feel affectively balanced (e.g. euthymic) and unbalanced (e.g. depressive, irritable, manic), providing novel insights for understanding human psychopathologies. Three systems are especially important for understanding depression: The separation distress (PAN- IC) system mediates the psychic pain of separation distress (i.e. excessive sadness and grief), which can be counteracted by minimizing PANIC arousals (as with low-dose opioids). De- pressive dysphoria also arises from reduced brain reward- seeking and related play urges (namely diminished enthusi- asm (SEEKING) and joyful exuberance (PLAY) which promote sustained amotivational states). We describe how an under- standing of these fundamental emotional circuits can pro- mote the development of novel antidepressive therapeutics – (i) low-dose buprenorphine to counteract depression and suicidal ideation emanating from too much psychic pain (PANIC overarousal), (ii) direct stimulation of the SEEKING sys- tem to counteract amotivational dysphoria, and (iii) the dis- covery and initial clinical testing of social-joy-promoting mol- ecules derived from the analysis of the PLAY system.

Date:
January 2014
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
47
Page/s:
383-393
Synonyms:
  • Experimental
  • Humour
  • Mental health
  • Physical play
  • Rough and tumble
  • Social play
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Play, . (2017) Right To Play International (Web Page)

Abstract:

Right To Play is a global organization that uses the transformative power of play to educate and empower children facing adversity. It was founded in 20​00 by Johann Olav Koss, a four-time Olympic gold medalist and social entrepreneur. Through sports and games, we help children build essential life skills and better futures, while driving social change in their communities with lasting impact​.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2017
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • At-risk
  • Children's rights
  • Games with rules
  • Mental health
  • Non-profit
  • Physical health
  • Physical play
  • Socio-economic background
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

PTI, . (2017) Play Therapy International (Web Page)

Abstract:

Our site is intended to provide an international information resource for therapeutic play, play therapy, filial play and creative arts therapies. It's designed for anyone interested in helping children with emotional literacy, behaviour (EBD) or mental health problems.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2017
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Games with rules
  • Mental health
  • Pretend play
  • Semiotic play
  • Symbolic play
  • Well-being outcomes

Riggs, N. et al. (2006) The Mediational Role of Neurocognition in the Behavioral Outcomes of a Social-Emotional Prevention Program in Elementary School Students: Effects of the PATHS Curriculum (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Neuropsychology is one field that holds promise in the construction of comprehensive, developmental models for the promotion of social competence and prevention of problem behavior. Neuropsychological models of behavior suggest that children's neurological functioning affects the regulation of strong emotions, as well as performance in social, cognitive, and behavioral spheres. The current study examines the underlying neurocognitive conceptual theory of action of one social-emotional development program. Hypothesized was that inhibitory control and verbal fluency would mediate the relationship between program condition and teacher-reported externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. Participants were 318 regular education students enrolled in the second or third grade. A series of regression analyses provided empirical support for (a) the effectiveness of the PATHS Curriculum in promoting inhibitory control and verbal fluency and (b) a partial mediating role for inhibitory control in the relation between prevention condition and behavioral outcomes. Implications are that programs designed to promote social and emotional development should consider comprehensive models that attend to neurocognitive functioning and development. Lack of consideration of neurocognitive pathways to the promotion of social competence may ignore important mechanisms through which prevention affects youth outcomes. Furthermore, the findings suggest that developers of social-emotional preventions should design curricula to explicitly promote the developmental integration of executive functioning, verbal processing, and emotional awareness. Doing so may enhance prevention outcomes particularly if those preventions are implemented during a time of peak neurocognitive development

Date:
January 2006
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
7
Page/s:
91-102
Synonyms:
  • Affective behaviour
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Mental health
  • Social-emotional
  • Well-being outcomes
  • Executive function
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

University, . (2017) Center on the Developing Child (Web Page)

Abstract:

Our mission is to drive science-based innovation that achieves breakthrough outcomes for children facing adversity.
We believe that advances in science provide a powerful source of new ideas focused on the early years of life. Founded in 2006, the Center catalyzes local, national, and international innovation in policy and practice focused on children and families. We design, test, and implement these ideas in collaboration with a broad network of research, practice, policy, community, and philanthropic leaders. Together, we seek transformational impacts on lifelong learning, behavior, and both physical and mental health.

Date:
January 2017
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Mental health
  • Physical health
  • Self-regulation
  • Well-being outcomes
  • Executive function
Research discipline: