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Abstract:
Author/s:
Date:
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Cooperative play
  • Creativity
  • Exploratory play
  • Functional play
  • Games with rules
  • Humour
  • Learning
  • Literacy
  • Mental health
  • Numeracy
  • Object play
  • Parallel play
  • Physical health
  • Physical play
  • Pretend play
  • Rough and tumble
  • Semiotic play
  • Sibling play
  • Social play
  • Solitary play
  • Symbolic play
  • Executive function
Research discipline:

Bateson, P. et al. (2014) Playfulness, Ideas, and Creativity: A Survey (Journal Article)

Abstract:

This article investigates whether self-reports about playfulness are related to self-reports about creativity and the alternate uses of objects. An on-line survey was conducted of how people think about themselves. One thousand, five hundred and thirty-six people completed the survey. They were asked whether a variety of statements were very characteristic of themselves through to whether they were very uncharacteristic. Respondents were then asked to offer alternative uses for 2 different objects. Those people who characterized themselves as being playful clearly thought of themselves as being creative. The self-reports of their playfulness, creativity, and innovation were positively correlated with each other and were validated with their suggested uses for 2 different objects. Personality measures were derived from the respondents' self-assessments. On the openness scale, the measure was positively correlated with the respondents' assessments of their own playfulness and with the number of alternative uses for two objects.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2014
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
26
Page/s:
219-222
Synonyms:
  • Correlational
  • Creativity
  • Playfulness
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Karpov, Y. (2005) The Neo-Vygotskian Approach to Child Development (Book)

Abstract:

THE NEO-VYGOTSKIAN APPROACH TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT
For the first time, the neo-Vygotskian approach to child development is intro- duced to English-speaking readers. Russian followers of Vygotsky have elaborated his ideas into a theory that integrates cognitive, motivational, and social aspects of child development with an emphasis on the role of children’s activity as mediated by adults in their development. This theory has become the basis for an innova- tive analysis of periods in child development and of the mechanism of children’s transitions from one period to the next. In this book, the discussion of the neo- Vygotskians’ approach to child development is supported by a review of their em- pirical data, much of which have never before been available to English-speaking readers. The discussion is also supported by a review of recent empirical find- ings ofWestern researchers, which are highly consistent with the neo-Vygotskian analysis of child development.
Yuriy V. Karpov is Professor and Associate Dean at the Graduate School of Education and Psychology of Touro College. He did his undergraduate and grad- uate studies and then worked as a faculty member at the School of Psychology of Moscow State University, the center of Vygotsky-based studies in the former Soviet Union. His studies on the implementation of Vygotsky’s ideas in educa- tion, psychological assessment, and the analysis of child development have been published as books, chapters, and journal articles in Russian, English, and Spanish.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2005
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Cultural context
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Object play
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Peers play
  • Pretend play
  • Social-emotional
Research discipline:

Mullineaux, P. et al. (2009) Preschool pretend play behaviors and early adolescent creativity (Journal Article)

Neuroscience, . (2018) The Education Brain Policy Brief for Late Childhood and Adolescence (Manuscript)

Abstract:

This brief relates to the second seminar in a series of three around the theme of ‘The Educated Brain’. Each research seminar includes talks from leading
researchers and roundtable discussions about the links between research and policy and practice. Presentations at the second seminar built on
discussions from seminar 1 by focusing on school years from age 8. Academic presentations covered: inequalities in educational outcomes, researching
the adolescent brain, the role of rhythm in cognitive development, transition to secondary school and bilingualism. The keynote lecture delivered by
Professor Charles Nelson reported on a body of work investigating the impact of early neglect on children and institutional care.

Date:
January 2018
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Keyword/s:
Synonyms:
Research discipline:

Skard, G. et al. (2008) Test of Playfulness (Book Section)

Abstract:
Date:
January 2008
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
71-93
Synonyms:
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Play assessment
  • Playfulness
  • Scale validation
Research discipline:

Veitch, J. et al. (2006) Where do children usually play? A qualitative study of parents’ perceptions of influences on children's active free-play (Journal Article)

Abstract:

This study explored the perceptions of 78 parents from low, mid and high socio-economic areas in Melbourne, Australia to increase understanding of where children play and why. Using an ecological model interviews with parents revealed that safety and social factors emerged as key social themes, facilities at parks and playgrounds, and urban design factors emerged as important physical environment themes. The children's level of independence and attitudes to active free-play were considered to be important individual level influences on active free-play. The study findings have important implications for future urban planning and children's opportunities for active free-play.

Date:
January 2006
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
12
Page/s:
383-393
Synonyms:
  • Free play
  • Outdoor play
  • Physical health
  • Physical play
  • Playground
  • Qualitative methodology
  • Socio-economic background
  • Well-being outcomes
Research discipline: