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Carver, A. et al. (2008) Playing it safe: The influence of neighbourhood safety on children's physical activity—A review (Journal Article)

Abstract:
Date:
January 2008
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
14
Page/s:
217-227
Synonyms:
  • Literature review
  • Outdoor play
  • Physical health
  • Physical play
  • Playground
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Hart, R. (2002) Containing children: some lessons on planning for play from New York City (Journal Article)

Abstract:

This paper relates the history of playground provision in New York to changing conceptions of childhood, and specifically to a felt need to ’contain’ children in order to keep them off the streets, safe from traffic and unsavoury influences - a trend that children have tended to resist. Playgrounds most often substitute a narrow range of physical activity for the spontaneous play in diverse environments that children more naturally crave. Not only do playgrounds fail to satisfy the complexity of children’s developmental needs, they also tend to separate children from the daily life of their communities - exposure to which is fundamental to the development of civil society. What is needed, argues the author, is not more segregated playgrounds, but a greater attempt to make neighbourhoods safe and welcoming for children, responding to their own preferences for free play close to home.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2002
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
14
Page/s:
135-148
Synonyms:
  • Free play
  • Literature review
  • Outdoor play
  • Physical play
  • Playground
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Holt, N. et al. (2008) Neighborhood and developmental differences in children's perceptions of opportunities for play and physical activity (Journal Article)

Abstract:

The purposes of this study were to examine perceptions of places to play and be physically active among children from two different urban neighborhoods, and evaluate these perceptions for age-related developmental differences. One hundred and sixty-eight children from grades K-6 (aged 6–12 years old) completed mental maps depicting places where they could play and be physically active. The children were recruited from schools in two neighborhoods—one a high-walkability (H-W) grid-style neighborhood, the other a low-walkability (L-W) lollipop-style (i.e., cul-de-sacs) neighborhood. Analysis revealed that children in the H-W neighborhood depicted more active transportation and less non-active transportation than children in the L-W neighborhood. Children in the lowest grades (K-2) in the L-W neighborhood depicted more play in the home/yard environment than the oldest children, more good weather image events than children in Grades 3–6, and less play outside the home/yard environment than children in Grades 3 and 4. In the H-W neighborhood, the youngest children (K-2) depicted significantly less play in the home/yard environment and less play outside the home/yard environment than older children (Grades 3–6). Thus, both the type of urban neighborhood and children's age moderated perceptions of places to play and be physically active.

Date:
January 2008
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
14
Page/s:
2-14
Synonyms:
  • Outdoor play
  • Physical health
  • Physical play
  • Playground
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Veitch, J. et al. (2006) Where do children usually play? A qualitative study of parents’ perceptions of influences on children's active free-play (Journal Article)

Abstract:

This study explored the perceptions of 78 parents from low, mid and high socio-economic areas in Melbourne, Australia to increase understanding of where children play and why. Using an ecological model interviews with parents revealed that safety and social factors emerged as key social themes, facilities at parks and playgrounds, and urban design factors emerged as important physical environment themes. The children's level of independence and attitudes to active free-play were considered to be important individual level influences on active free-play. The study findings have important implications for future urban planning and children's opportunities for active free-play.

Date:
January 2006
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
12
Page/s:
383-393
Synonyms:
  • Free play
  • Outdoor play
  • Physical health
  • Physical play
  • Playground
  • Qualitative methodology
  • Socio-economic background
  • Well-being outcomes
Research discipline: